Nanga Parbat : The Killer Mountain

nanga_parbat

She is a cutthroat but alluring bonny. She stands with all her grace since centuries in the greatHimalayan range in the south of the mighty Indus River. She is truly the prestige of the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan. The mountaineers worldwide at once would have known that we are talking about the astounding eight-thousander, the naked mountain which is commonly known asNanga Parbat. Nanga Parbat is a Sanskrit word which literally means the Naked Mountain. We named it as cutthroat due to its devastating trekking history which has killed many of the climbers in past. Even today it is famous with the name of Killer Mountain.

For the climbers and mountaineers, Nanga Parbat is certainly is a sensational destination that is no doubt monstrous in the sense of world’s the most dangerous summits. But for a naturalist, Nanga Parbat is a wonderful place to be visited once in a life. The Naked Mountain or Nanga Parbat is the world’s 9th highest peak having a summit elevation of 8,126 m (26,660 ft ) which is also not far from Karakorum range and it is located in the Astore District of Gilgit-Baltistan in Pakistan-administered Kashmir. For its deadliest trekking, Nanga Parbat is declared in the most prominent peaks of the world as well.

Nanga Parbat was first climbed on July 3, 1953 by Austrian climber Hermann Buhl, a member of a German-Austrian team. The climb of Nanga Parbat is so lethal due to the severe weather conditions and the dangerous avalanches. Nanga Parbat had taken more lives of the climbers than any other peaks of the world. Another prominent feature of Nanga Parbat is that it has never been climbed in winter. Nanga Parbat has three faces, the Rakhiot (Ra Kot) face in the north and south silver crags and silver plateau; the rocky Diamir face which converts itself into ice fields around Nanga Parbat peak. The Rupal face of Nanga Parbat is deemed the highest precipice in the world. It would not be an overwhelming statement that Nanga Parbat, the Killer Mountain is the top most dream for any professional alpinist, hiking of which is filled with ultimate adventure and thrill.

Ibn-e-Battuta

World Of Battuta

Ibn-e-Battuta, aka Shams Ud Din

Abu Abdullah Muhammad Ibn-e-Battuta, also known as Shams Ud Din, was born at Tangier, Morocco, on the 24th February 1304.  He left Tangier in 1325, when he was 21 years of age. His travels lasted for about 30 years, after which he returned to Fez, Morocco at the court of Sultan Abu ‘Inan and dictated accounts of his journeys to Ibn Juzay. These are known as the famous Travels (Rihala) of Ibn Battuta. He died at Fez in 1369.

Ibn Battuta was the only medieval traveller who is known to have visited the lands of every Muslim ruler of his time. He also travelled in Sri Lanka, China and Byzantium and South Russia. The mere extent of his travels is estimated at no less than 75,000 miles. Ibn Battuta’s sea voyages reveal that the Muslims completely dominated the maritime activity of the Red Sea, the Arabian Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Chinese waters.

The Great Travels Of Ibn-e-Battuta

The Great Travels Of Ibn-e-Battuta

Ibn-e-Battuta, one of the most remarkable travellers of all time, visited China sixty years after Marco Polo and in fact travelled 75,000 miles, much ore than Marco Polo. Yet Battuta is never mentioned in geography books used in Muslim countries, let alone those in the West.

Ibn Battuta’s  contribution to geography is unquestionably as great as that of any geographer yet the accounts of his travels are not easily accessible except to the specialist. The omission of reference to Ibn Battuta’s contribution in geography books is not an isolated example.

All great Musiims whether historians, doctors, astronomers, scientists or chemists suffer the same fate. One can understand why these great Muslims are ignored by the West. We must rediscover the contributions of Muslims in  fields such as science, medicine, engineering, architecture and astronomy.